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By Peter L. Duren, Richard Askey, Uta C. Merzbach

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He had just become internationally famous for his proof of Poincare's last geometric theorem. Moreover Bocher had devoted much of his invited address that summer at the International Mathematical MATHEMATICS AT HARVARD, 1836-1944 27 Congress in Cambridge, England, to explaining the importance and depth of my father's work on boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations. Equally remarkable, my father had been chosen to review for the Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. (17, pp. 14-28) the "New Haven Colloquium Lectures" given by his official thesis supervisor, E.

These were admirably reviewed by Marston Morse in [GDB, I, pp. xv-xlix; Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 52, 357-831, and it would make little sense for me to discuss them further here. At Harvard, however, there were very few who could appreciate these deep researches, and so from 1920 on, my father's ideas about mathematical physics and the philosophy of science aroused much more interest. These were also the themes of his invited addresses at plenary sessions of the International Mathematical Congresses of 1928 and 1936, and of most of his public lectures.

Amer. Math. Soc. 52, 357-831, and it would make little sense for me to discuss them further here. At Harvard, however, there were very few who could appreciate these deep researches, and so from 1920 on, my father's ideas about mathematical physics and the philosophy of science aroused much more interest. These were also the themes of his invited addresses at plenary sessions of the International Mathematical Congresses of 1928 and 1936, and of most of his public lectures. Accordingly, I shall concentrate below on these aspects of his work (cf.

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